Topics

Water tank replacement

Randy Trullo <randytrullo@...>
 

Hello all, newbie here.  We are looking at a willard 40 and from the information we found it has a leaking water tank. My question is has anyone replaced theirs and how difficult was the job.  Any information would be helpful.  Thanks. 

donna lynn
 

Hi Randy,

How bad a leak is it?  If it's not too bad I'd suggest trying JBWeld.  We never replaced our water tanks on the Willard but on a sailboat we did and each tank (20 gallons) was about $200.  We did the work ourselves so the labor was sweat equity and the tanks were easily accessible.  

On a Willard 40 you would have to somehow cut out the old ones (access is a BIG issue) and maybe put in a set of smaller tanks that will fit in the current floor access panels.  The other option is the remove the entire forward cabin including the floor.  That way you'd be able to put in larger tanks.  But, that is an enormous project.

Donna & Jim
Blue Moon 
Willard-40 FBS
Norwalk, CT


On Wed, Dec 4, 2019 at 4:19 PM Randy Trullo <randytrullo@...> wrote:
Hello all, newbie here.  We are looking at a willard 40 and from the information we found it has a leaking water tank. My question is has anyone replaced theirs and how difficult was the job.  Any information would be helpful.  Thanks. 

Sven
 

A prior owner cut an access hole in the SS tank and installed a 300 gallon bladder tank.
 
 
 
-Sven

Dan McNames
 

Replacing fuel and water tanks on a W40 is an issue.  When built this was not a consideration, from production cost point of view.  I have used above deck and under deck fuel and water bladder tanks.  They do have issues.  Unless you want to do some structural cutting, I personally would either daisy chain a set of smaller stainless tanks that can be worked down one at a time or just remove the whole existing tank system, build a cage in place to hold a new bladder.  Putting a new bladder into a rusty tanks with a cut hole is a temporary fix.  I personally would not use for long term.

If this owner cut a hole and put in a bladder, I would look at the entire boat with a good eye to see what other short cuts were taken.  This was the problem I had earlier this year looking for a W40 that did not need a lot of cleanup.  I don't have the time again right now.  In about 18 months will go looking again.

Dan McN

Peter P
 

Sounds like a sensible approach Sven. You're pretty knowledgeable in boat systems - any concerns?

M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Hull #40

Ensenada, MX

Sven
 

Hi Peter,

My only concern is possible chafe over time but as with most of the stuff onboard,  the refits have been of impressively high quality.  One thing I have wondered about is why a SS water tank had to be replaced in the first place ?  Maybe the SS I see is not from an original tank but as a structural support after an iron (?) tank was removed ?

The thing that bugs me about the bladder is that I have to lift out a hatch under the carpet in order to see how full it is.  I have a hole in the carpet that I can put a calibrated dowel down into to feel how far it has collapsed but that is a pretty crude measurement.  I don't really feel like spending $600-700 on a Tank Tender or similar pressure sensor for just the water tank.

How is your refit coming along ?



-Sven

Pease, Dan
 

I just replaced SS water tanks on another make vessel. 30 years.  Lucky for me they were under a queen size bed. Easy access.

SS is not the miracle metal that its name makes it out to be.  For one thing it takes considerable skill to weld (properly), and if there was an issue with the tank, it was most probably a weld defect.

A strong point for SS is that it cuts hard, not going to help you.

Sometimes a good glass man can show you how to make short and neat work out of cutting a good access so you can at least get at the old tank for removal, and replacement.

On the East coat there are numerous outfits that “weld” up custom plastic tanks custom, not too onerous.

Keeping the bladder will hurt resale for sure, but if you get a break on your cost that may not matter.

Dan



On Thu, Dec 5, 2019 at 6:36 PM Sven <southbound@...> wrote:
Hi Peter,

My only concern is possible chafe over time but as with most of the stuff onboard,  the refits have been of impressively high quality.  One thing I have wondered about is why a SS water tank had to be replaced in the first place ?  Maybe the SS I see is not from an original tank but as a structural support after an iron (?) tank was removed ?

The thing that bugs me about the bladder is that I have to lift out a hatch under the carpet in order to see how full it is.  I have a hole in the carpet that I can put a calibrated dowel down into to feel how far it has collapsed but that is a pretty crude measurement.  I don't really feel like spending $600-700 on a Tank Tender or similar pressure sensor for just the water tank.

How is your refit coming along ?



-Sven

Peter P
 


My SS water tanks - 2 x 100g - on my W36 look like 304 stainless and are located below the aft deck. They are suspended quite a ways above the bilge area, and the lazarette is well ventilated in general. Placement of the W40 tank makes it susceptible to moisture, and welds are never as corrosion free as the SS it joins. I recently saw an online video of a one of a Nordhavn that put bladder tanks on the aft deck so they could make it to the Marquesas or something similar. Looked like they had some sort of Cordura fabric skin over them as protection (chafe below/sides; UV above). Given the alternatives, I like the idea of a bladder-liner. Surprised there's 300g of capacity - big tank!

I have never had success with tank fill-gauges of any type. I feel like I'm a complete dunce, but the little pressure-pump ones always give me conflicting read-outs. I just can't get a consistent reading. Probably operator error. For Weebles, I have always been able to roughly tell when the water tanks are low just by how the trim changes (which, when you think about it, isn't a great design feature). I used to live aboard a Uniflite 42, and later, my W36 (total of 6-years or so), both times with a girlfriend, and they both carried 200g of water. 200g lasted almost exactly 1-week in all circumstances. As part of my refit, I thought about adding a sight glass to my water tanks which would be pretty easy, but decided against. Just not a big thing for me at this point, but maybe later. 

Refit - its running woefully behind schedule, mostly because I keep adding stuff. Rather than troubling the entire WBO membership with the occasional long-ish post, I added a Sub-Group to this Groups.IO site titled https://willardboatowners.groups.io/g/RefitRemodelReconfigure/messages where I've put a couple updates, and there is a great update from someone refitting a W30 Horizon Motorsailor; and someone working on one of the few W36 motorsailors that he picked-up at a tax lien auction or something. I'm due to add another update - I'm in Ensenada as I write for a check-in. Recall, I am having the forward stateroom reconfigured from a double-bunk on aft/stbd side to a large v-berth forward. Initial rough-in cabinets were put in yesterday and I'm happy with the changes. Would be great to see some of the work you've been doing on your W40. Given your background in sail/cruising, I'm guessing you have some great ideas. 


M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Hull #40

Ensenada, MX

Sven
 

Hi Peter,

Wow, thanks for the link to the refit subgroup ... impressive !

Our refit is actually a lot less ambitious than what we see in the subgroup.  We knew what we wanted and looked for a trawler for 2-.5 years before we found LAGOM (née Quest), an '84 40' Willard PH.  We also knew that we didn't want another live-in refit.  We really lucked out,  Quest had a major refit some time back and that's when the fuel tank and water tank were replaced and the non-skid redone etc.  The electrical wiring is to die for.

We did think we'd need to replace the Perkins due to the blue smoke (and after reading the Perkins pages about that) but it turns out that the engine is in really good shape.  No replacement needed.

Most of our work has been in upgrading systems:  Furuno MFD,  radar,  AIS etc..  Tearing out the 4 kW cruise generator,  tearing out 3 old reverse air systems and installing one central 16,000 BTU reverse air Webasto.  Installing a wonderful Splendide washer-dryer.  Replacing the Espar diesel heater.  Installed a completely new solid teak and glass salon door.  Built a new salon table.  Installing a 30 GPH RO watermaker (in progress).  Replacing lifelines with 30" SS railing.  Replacing the cabling for the paravanes.  Installing top-up solar panels (in process) and a Balmar smart balmar battery monitor.  Replacing the prop-shaft due to corrosion and replacing the stuffing box.  Replacing the exploded holding tank macerator pump.  Installing a new fresh water head.  Having the antique Compu-Course AP rebuilt.  Sealing the caprail against leaks (almost done).  Rebuilding the galley with usable cabinetry.  Replacing all lights with LEDs.

Other stuff still to be done include installing the new Newfound Metals round portholes in the PH,  installing the holding tank monitor,  building drawers for tools in the laundry/work-room.  Replacing the frosted Lexan windows in the PH doors.

I would like to redesign the v-berth into a centerline bunk but we're not ready to tackle that big job quite yet and the massive v-berth functions as a huge play-pen in its current configuration.

More than you wanted to know ?  :-)


-Sven & Nancy

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