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fuel tank thickness

Ana
 

Hi there,
I have a W Vega Horizon 30 from 1974; Nuala May. You can see this beauty by clicking here :) 

I still have the 2 original black iron fuel tanks that came with the boat. Anybody can tell me what thickness these tanks might be?
Thank you,

Ana
Denny Island, BC

Pease, Dan
 

1/8th.  Replaced my leaky tanks 5 years ago.

On Sun, Feb 2, 2020 at 10:14 PM Ana <ana.movingplanets@...> wrote:

Hi there,
I have a W Vega Horizon 30 from 1974; Nuala May. You can see this beauty by clicking here :) 

I still have the 2 original black iron fuel tanks that came with the boat. Anybody can tell me what thickness these tanks might be?
Thank you,

Ana
Denny Island, BC

Ana
 

Thank you, Dan, that is very helpful! I happen to have just removed the engine to rebuild it, and at the very least I would like to deal with the stb tank, which is the one in bad shape and has a slow leak.

I assume all the sides including the top are 1/8"? Would you be able to share anything about your tank replacement experience? E.g. Where did you find your leaks were? How did you go about getting the tanks out? What did you install in their place? 
Anything you can share will be appreciated immensely, or perhaps you posted about this already on this site?
Many thanks again,
Ana

captainbligh01
 

air chisel and large air compressor might be the tool of choice

On Feb 2, 2020 8:14 PM, Ana <ana.movingplanets@...> wrote:

Thank you, Dan, that is very helpful! I happen to have just removed the engine to rebuild it, and at the very least I would like to deal with the stb tank, which is the one in bad shape and has a slow leak.

I assume all the sides including the top are 1/8"? Would you be able to share anything about your tank replacement experience? E.g. Where did you find your leaks were? How did you go about getting the tanks out? What did you install in their place? 
Anything you can share will be appreciated immensely, or perhaps you posted about this already on this site?
Many thanks again,
Ana


Pease, Dan
 

I’ve enclosed a couple pics taken during my tank swap.  Having trouble getting the right pic to enclose.  Running short on time right now.

IMHO it doesn’t matter where the leaks are, if you already have the engine out, and are thinking of “repairing” the tanks, they will have to be removed anyway, so why not just bite the bullet and replace them.

Unfortunately you will have to sacrifice the nice varnished cabin sole to do any work on your tanks as they were installed before the cabin sole was installed.

In my case, the sole was just glass over plywood so I chose to cut around the hatch and remove the whole unit.  It was a big job and you have to decide how dedicated you are to continuing with this craft.

The old tanks fit so tightly that I had to pry them out.  They were rusty and questionable everywhere.  Unless your boat was held in fresh water for much of its early life, your 45 years old steel tanks owe you nothing.

Also enclosed is photo of one new tank in place, built by Luther in Rhode Island.,  very good aluminum tanks.

Dan

On Sun, Feb 2, 2020 at 11:46 PM captainbligh01 via Groups.Io <captainbligh01=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
air chisel and large air compressor might be the tool of choice

On Feb 2, 2020 8:14 PM, Ana <ana.movingplanets@...> wrote:

Thank you, Dan, that is very helpful! I happen to have just removed the engine to rebuild it, and at the very least I would like to deal with the stb tank, which is the one in bad shape and has a slow leak.

I assume all the sides including the top are 1/8"? Would you be able to share anything about your tank replacement experience? E.g. Where did you find your leaks were? How did you go about getting the tanks out? What did you install in their place? 
Anything you can share will be appreciated immensely, or perhaps you posted about this already on this site?
Many thanks again,
Ana


Peter P
 


Dan - surprised to hear the cabin sole needs to be compromised. I would think the old tanks could be cut-out with a sawzall and slightly smaller tanks installed. I put inspection ports in my W30 Searcher when I had her, so it's been a long time, so perhaps I do not remember correctly. Thoughts?

M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Hull #40

Ensenada, MX

Pease, Dan
 

Peter,

I looked at that, but number one, you have to ask what you want to make the boat into.  Do you want to limit all future users to a boat with less capacity?  That’s a choice for any owner to make on their own.

Number 2, working in that area was a bitch even with the hatch completely cut out, I really cannot imagine trying to reach up In there with a grinder of sawzall, or nibbles, whatever.

3. Just the physics of getting any new tank into the hole would be a stretch since the long dimension of the hatch is athwartships and the long dimension of the tank is fore and aft means you have to turn the tank 90 degrees to get it in place.

It is something to consider.

On the other hand, I gave up on trying to get the engine out without removing the transmission. Maybe hire a magician 🎩?  

But I always do the best for the boat that I can.  While I was being a glutton for punishment, and had the engine out, I also removed all the original ballast and replaced with lead encased in resin.   Pretty sure better than new!

Dan

On Mon, Feb 3, 2020 at 8:14 AM Peter P via Groups.Io <pete_pisc=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Dan - surprised to hear the cabin sole needs to be compromised. I would think the old tanks could be cut-out with a sawzall and slightly smaller tanks installed. I put inspection ports in my W30 Searcher when I had her, so it's been a long time, so perhaps I do not remember correctly. Thoughts?

M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Hull #40

Ensenada, MX

Pease, Dan
 

Guys,  I sent pics three different ways, let me know if they came thru.

Dan

Peter P
 


Dan - two pictures came through. One of your Luther tank, second showing deck cutaway with one tank installed. 

Thanks for the explanation. After seeing your picture, I understood exactly what you were talking about and why you cut away the cabin sole. Very nice work.  

M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Hull #40

Ensenada, MX

Pease, Dan
 

Thanks, a labor of love.  You know all about that!  Salute!

On Mon, Feb 3, 2020 at 9:11 AM Peter P via Groups.Io <pete_pisc=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Dan - two pictures came through. One of your Luther tank, second showing deck cutaway with one tank installed. 

Thanks for the explanation. After seeing your picture, I understood exactly what you were talking about and why you cut away the cabin sole. Very nice work.  

M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Hull #40

Ensenada, MX

Ana
 

Thank you all for very helpful comments, explanations and pictures. I love this boat as a snail cannot help but love its house, so I will be doing it one way or another, just trying to figure out what the best way would be. Up to now, I have read about more people cutting the tanks out in pieces than any other way, but I quite like what Dan did and I have the varnished sole off anyway. I'd think I can put it back in place once it's all said and done. In any case, it pales into insignificance when compared to a leaky fuel tank!
Thanks again everybody!

 Capt. Ana on MSV Nuala May, Denny Island BC

https://willardboats.org/boats/nuala-may

Pease, Dan
 

Ana,

Cutting out and replacing the sole was a minor job compared to the rest.  I like to call it a “job well dreaded”.

In your case your teak and holly will hide the seam.  In my case I have a heavy rubber mat, which helps knock down some sound.

Best,

Dan

On Mon, Feb 3, 2020 at 12:00 PM Ana <ana.movingplanets@...> wrote:

Thank you all for very helpful comments, explanations and pictures. I love this boat as a snail cannot help but love its house, so I will be doing it one way or another, just trying to figure out what the best way would be. Up to now, I have read about more people cutting the tanks out in pieces than any other way, but I quite like what Dan did and I have the varnished sole off anyway. I'd think I can put it back in place once it's all said and done. In any case, it pales into insignificance when compared to a leaky fuel tank!
Thanks again everybody!

 Capt. Ana on MSV Nuala May, Denny Island BC

https://willardboats.org/boats/nuala-may

richarddalaska
 

One of the fuel tanks developed a small leak two years ago so I decided to replace both pf them. The material cost is negligible compared to the labor costs. I elected to order 1/4” marine grade aluminum. The folks doing the work used a sawmill to cut up the old tank with the engine removed. The new tanks are much lower and longer. I don’t know the reason they elected to go that route. They moved the muffler and hot water tank to the aft lazarett. I made sure these tanks were ,mounted so that all surfaces received air: i.e no standing water possible. 

The cost was excessive but this was done in Alaska @$105/hr without my presence. I had no choice.

Now Puffin has a new Beta engine ((2013) and new tanks. What next?
--
Richard P
Willard 40 -Lilliana-Sea of Cortez, Mexico
Willard 30- Puffin- SE Alaska
Tiffany Jayne 34-sailboat- Dancer- SF Bay