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Flybridge removal on a Willard 40

WILLIAM FOGARTY
 

Does anyone have any experience or knowledge regarding the removal of the flybridge on a Willard 40 Trawler.  I recall reading an article about the 40 Trawler and that it could be transport overland.  I don’t know how difficult it is to get the flybridge off.   There are screws that go through the flange of the flybridge on the interior of the flybridge. I don’t know how the flybridge is attracted to the cabin top on the outboard side of the cabin top.  
Any input/thoughts/experience would be very helpful. 

richarddalaska
 

I believe the flybridge is just held down with those screws. However, if you are asking this question because you want to truck the boat, and if you will be paying boat yard rates for the work, it is cheaper to ship by sea. All the wiring needs to be disconnected and reconnected, as well as the hydraulics for the steering. These costs add up fast if you are not doing the work your self. 
--
Richard P
Willard 40 -Lilliana-Sea of Cortez, Mexico
Willard 30- Puffin- SE Alaska
Tiffany Jayne 34-sailboat- Dancer- SF Bay

dpstainsby Stainsby
 

Do you have any idea of who might reasonably ship a Willard 4O from near Juneau to Port Hardy by sea and approximately what it would cost?

Dick Stainsby , Former owner Foley's Fault 36 Sedan

On 2020-01-10 12:57 p.m., richarddalaska wrote:
I believe the flybridge is just held down with those screws. However, if you are asking this question because you want to truck the boat, and if you will be paying boat yard rates for the work, it is cheaper to ship by sea. All the wiring needs to be disconnected and reconnected, as well as the hydraulics for the steering. These costs add up fast if you are not doing the work your self. 
--
Richard P
Willard 40 -Lilliana-Sea of Cortez, Mexico
Willard 30- Puffin- SE Alaska
Tiffany Jayne 34-sailboat- Dancer- SF Bay

Pease, Dan
 

Why not deliver her on own bottom?  Road delivery is twice as far.

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 5:27 PM dpstainsby Stainsby <dpstainsby@...> wrote:

Do you have any idea of who might reasonably ship a Willard 4O from near Juneau to Port Hardy by sea and approximately what it would cost?

Dick Stainsby , Former owner Foley's Fault 36 Sedan

On 2020-01-10 12:57 p.m., richarddalaska wrote:
I believe the flybridge is just held down with those screws. However, if you are asking this question because you want to truck the boat, and if you will be paying boat yard rates for the work, it is cheaper to ship by sea. All the wiring needs to be disconnected and reconnected, as well as the hydraulics for the steering. These costs add up fast if you are not doing the work your self. 
--
Richard P
Willard 40 -Lilliana-Sea of Cortez, Mexico
Willard 30- Puffin- SE Alaska
Tiffany Jayne 34-sailboat- Dancer- SF Bay

richarddalaska
 

The trip from Juneau to Port Hardy is an easy flat water delivery. The only open sections are ~3 hours before Prince Rupert and 5 hours before Port Hardy. It is a comfortable 2.5 weeks or about one week if you run all day. I have made that trip about ten times in a  Willard 30 and never had a problem.

If the boat is not seaworthy you can ship by barte from Juneau south (call AML Alaska Marine Lines). They can supply a cradle for a price. However I am not sure if they are allowed to stop in Canada.

At the end of August there are numerous fisherman from Washington who will head south to Seattle. Maybe you could find one of the more experienced crew on a seiner to deliver the boat to Pt. Hardy.

But why Pt Hardy?  There are no substantial marine facilities there. Port McNeill is more boater friendly. Just a few hours south of Port Hardy.

Richard P


--
Richard P
Willard 40 -Lilliana-Sea of Cortez, Mexico
Willard 30- Puffin- SE Alaska
Tiffany Jayne 34-sailboat- Dancer- SF Bay

dpstainsby Stainsby
 

Hello, I want to apologize for inserting myself into the middle of this discussion about removing a fly bridge. I hope I haven't confused the issue

Richard P's comments on shipping by sea caught my attention because a while ago I was interested in a Willard 40 with an engine in very poor or not working at all condition. The boat was near Juneau  and when I checked into shipping it by barge or towing the boat by somebody already headed in the right direction the cost wasn't justified by the boats condition. I don't know if the boat is still available but if somebody knows a cost effective way of getting it to Vancouver Island I would still be interested. I can  also be contacted at dpstainsby@...

On 2020-01-10 4:01 p.m., Pease, Dan wrote:
Why not deliver her on own bottom?  Road delivery is twice as far.

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 5:27 PM dpstainsby Stainsby <dpstainsby@...> wrote:

Do you have any idea of who might reasonably ship a Willard 4O from near Juneau to Port Hardy by sea and approximately what it would cost?

Dick Stainsby , Former owner Foley's Fault 36 Sedan

On 2020-01-10 12:57 p.m., richarddalaska wrote:
I believe the flybridge is just held down with those screws. However, if you are asking this question because you want to truck the boat, and if you will be paying boat yard rates for the work, it is cheaper to ship by sea. All the wiring needs to be disconnected and reconnected, as well as the hydraulics for the steering. These costs add up fast if you are not doing the work your self. 
--
Richard P
Willard 40 -Lilliana-Sea of Cortez, Mexico
Willard 30- Puffin- SE Alaska
Tiffany Jayne 34-sailboat- Dancer- SF Bay

dpstainsby Stainsby
 

Hi Richard,

Thanks for the information. The reason for Port Hardy was  I was trying to find the shortest route to Vancouver Island to save costs. I live near Nanaimo so that, if possible would be even better. I believe it was Linden Shipping in Washington that I contacted and they did have an issue with stopping in Canada and the cost was way more than the boat was worth. I then contacted a marine towing company who referred me to somebody heading south for a refit. Also more than I could justify for the boat.

Dick

On 2020-01-10 4:22 p.m., richarddalaska wrote:
The trip from Juneau to Port Hardy is an easy flat water delivery. The only open sections are ~3 hours before Prince Rupert and 5 hours before Port Hardy. It is a comfortable 2.5 weeks or about one week if you run all day. I have made that trip about ten times in a  Willard 30 and never had a problem.

If the boat is not seaworthy you can ship by barte from Juneau south (call AML Alaska Marine Lines). They can supply a cradle for a price. However I am not sure if they are allowed to stop in Canada.

At the end of August there are numerous fisherman from Washington who will head south to Seattle. Maybe you could find one of the more experienced crew on a seiner to deliver the boat to Pt. Hardy.

But why Pt Hardy?  There are no substantial marine facilities there. Port McNeill is more boater friendly. Just a few hours south of Port Hardy.

Richard P


--
Richard P
Willard 40 -Lilliana-Sea of Cortez, Mexico
Willard 30- Puffin- SE Alaska
Tiffany Jayne 34-sailboat- Dancer- SF Bay

richarddalaska
 

I believe the boat you are referring to is called the Marie C. It has been moored  in the harbor of Kake, AK, for the past several years. It looks abandoned but the harbor master told me the owner still pays the moorage and occasionally visits the boat. At Alaska labor rates this boat could not be restored. I have a few photos of it on my phone from last summer.  It would be great project boat if it could be moved to warmer climes. I have not heard that it was for sale but it does not seem to be worked on. However, Kake moorage is extremely cheap so it costs little to store it..

AML the barge line, stops in Kake and they have an enormous fork lift for containers that could probably lift that boat onto a cradle.
--
Richard P
Willard 40 -Lilliana-Sea of Cortez, Mexico
Willard 30- Puffin- SE Alaska
Tiffany Jayne 34-sailboat- Dancer- SF Bay

dpstainsby Stainsby
 

You are right about the boat and I don't know if it is currently available. It's a boat that should be brought back to life but I would have to be able to get it home for very little money. I know I should just forget about her but It's kind of like a brain worm that won't go away. I saw some pictures from a few years ago and logic tells me she is in even worse condition now.

Thanks again for the information, I may check into the Seiner idea although It might be Saner to forget it.

Dick


On 2020-01-10 5:26 p.m., richarddalaska wrote:

I believe the boat you are referring to is called the Marie C. It has been moored  in the harbor of Kake, AK, for the past several years. It looks abandoned but the harbor master told me the owner still pays the moorage and occasionally visits the boat. At Alaska labor rates this boat could not be restored. I have a few photos of it on my phone from last summer.  It would be great project boat if it could be moved to warmer climes. I have not heard that it was for sale but it does not seem to be worked on. However, Kake moorage is extremely cheap so it costs little to store it..

AML the barge line, stops in Kake and they have an enormous fork lift for containers that could probably lift that boat onto a cradle.
--
Richard P
Willard 40 -Lilliana-Sea of Cortez, Mexico
Willard 30- Puffin- SE Alaska
Tiffany Jayne 34-sailboat- Dancer- SF Bay

Richard A. Miller
 

It depends on how the Flybridge was bedded when last installed.  On the Adria the first owner elected to have the flybridge bedded/cemented with 3M 5200 (against Willard’s recommendation) so it would be very difficult to remove.  A flybridge differently bedded would be a different proposition.

Richard Miller 1999/2000 Willard 40 Adria

On Jan 10, 2020, at 2:33 PM, Wfoga71400 via Groups.Io <Wfoga71400@...> wrote:

Does anyone have any experience or knowledge regarding the removal of the flybridge on a Willard 40 Trawler.  I recall reading an article about the 40 Trawler and that it could be transport overland.  I don’t know how difficult it is to get the flybridge off.   There are screws that go through the flange of the flybridge on the interior of the flybridge. I don’t know how the flybridge is attracted to the cabin top on the outboard side of the cabin top.  
Any input/thoughts/experience would be very helpful. 

Sven
 

Your question gave me an excuse to play with the Navionics autorouting capability.  It looks like it would be a great 1-week trip,  running 12 hours per day.  That's assuming the engine and other systems are in good shape.

I assume one could make most of the trip inside the archipelago rather than the long straight passages chosen by the autorouting,  that should make it a spectacular trip !  Makes me wish we were up in that area (with sweaters,  a good heater and foul weather gear) !

Pease, Dan
 

Unless of course you want the boat moved soon. Isn't it winter time?


On Sat, Jan 11, 2020, 11:11 Sven <southbound@...> wrote:
Your question gave me an excuse to play with the Navionics autorouting capability.  It looks like it would be a great 1-week trip,  running 12 hours per day.  That's assuming the engine and other systems are in good shape.

I assume one could make most of the trip inside the archipelago rather than the long straight passages chosen by the autorouting,  that should make it a spectacular trip !  Makes me wish we were up in that area (with sweaters,  a good heater and foul weather gear) !

richarddalaska
 

The trip from Juneau to Vancouver is probably the most beautiful cruise in America if you like majestic scenery, flat water, a lot of wildlife, perfectly sheltered anchorages, and no people. If you like marinas and restaurants it would not be pleasant. However out is a summer cruising area. In winter the days are too short and the weather too inclement.
--
Richard P
Willard 40 -Lilliana-Sea of Cortez, Mexico
Willard 30- Puffin- SE Alaska
Tiffany Jayne 34-sailboat- Dancer- SF Bay

fbailey@...
 

Our W-40 (One Unit), originally (Rincon), was trucked to Seattle from southern California by the previous owner. He removed the flybridge, for bridge clearances, which he claims was "straight forward". The removal and replacement were done by local boatyards.

Forrest Bailey